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Posted by on Jul 23, 2018 in Blog

Turning Circles

We’re down at Penns Place, today having a little fun on the ground before heading up high for the sunset…

Penns Place in the dying light…

Finding Form

Now that I am happy that the craft is relatively safe and stable in the air I can turn my attention more towards filming techniques, especially the unique and unusual perspectives offered by having total gimbal independence from the craft. So I start this video exploring the travelling pan, where our camera rotates at a constant rate while the craft moves in a straight line, and then later a much more variant flight path. This produces really nice, slightly dizzying epic sweeps of the surroundings, and the effect becomes much more pronounced if you add altitude change and reverse direction into the mix as well. Loving the results of that so far, I imagine I’ll do quite a lot of it wherever flying circumstances allow (can only happen where you have clear VLoS for the entire path, because you obviously can’t rely on a screen that isn’t pointing where the craft is…

Testing Conditions

All flights previous to this have been done in almost wind-free conditions, as it is sensible to start gently, and get the feel of the machine without wind in the mix, but now we need to see how it behaves in a variety of windy conditions. As luck would have it, there have been 2 days in a row with a gentle but steady headwind coming form the South, and on Sunday it turned quite gusty in the afternoon when I was flying. This video was made on the night before, when the wind was still pretty mild, but I did notice that the Typhoon had a lot more work to do in the air to remain position-locked, but work it did, and the results of the wind are not noticeable at all as far as i can tell in the footge, so that’s another good step on the way to trusting your flyer…

All about the sun

We started on the ground, but we are here for the sunset, so eventually we go up and get some of that, rewarded by some very fetching colours, and nice sense of dusk. I don’t have to go ridiculously high to get these shots – just above the treeline is usually enough, and most of my sunset panoramas, including these ones, are done at around 200 ft. I lock the exposure for these because I like the sense of dusk light you get as you pan away from the sun.

A beautiful cloud-occluded sunset today…

Next up, it’s about time we did some Town Flying…

Aero J